Elementary Student Profiles of Learning

Kindergarten Language Arts

Language Arts Student Learning Profile

Kindergarten
In Kindergarten, students engage in many activities that help them develop their oral language skills and help them begin to read and write.
Kindergarten students:
  • take part in language activities that extend their vocabulary conceptual knowledge.
  • learn to follow directions and develop the language of schooling.
  • discuss the meanings of words from selections read aloud.
  • express themselves in complete thought.
  • listen to children's literature from classic and contemporary works.
  • listen to nonfiction and informational material.
  • learn to listen attentively, ask and respond to questions, and retell stories.
  • know simple story structure and distinguish fiction from nonfiction.
  • identify and write the letters of the alphabet.
  • learn that individual letters are different from printed words.
  • learn that words have spaces between them.
  • learn that print is read from left-to-right and from top-to-bottom.
  • learn that spoken language is composed of sequence of sounds.
  • learn to segment and identify the sounds in spoken words.
  • name each letter of the alphabet.
  • begin to associate spoken sounds with the letter or letters that represent them.
  • write the letters of the alphabet, their names, and other words.
  • dictate messages and stories for others to write.
  • begin to use their knowledge of sounds and letters by themselves.
  • begin to use this knowledge to read words and simple stories.

Kindergarten Math

Mathematics Student Learning Profile

Kindergarten

Within a well-balanced mathematics curriculum, the primary focal points at Kindergarten are developing number and operation concepts, creating strategies for solving word problems, and compare measureable attributes of objects.

The student will:

  • Apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace.
  • Use a problem-solving model that incorporates formulating a plan or strategy, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution.
  • Select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems.
  • Communicate mathematical ideas and reasoning using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate.
  • Analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas.
  • Display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.
  • Count forward and backward to at least 20 with and without objects.
  • Read, write, and represent whole numbers from 0 to at least 20 with and without objects or pictures
  • Count a set of objects up to at least 20 and demonstrate that the last number said tells the number of objects in the set regardless of their arrangement or order.
  • Recognize instantly the quantity of a small group of objects in organized and random arrangements.
  • Generate a set using concrete and pictorial models that represents a number that is more than, less than, and equal to a given number up to 20.
  • Generate a number that is one more than or one less than another number up to at least 20.
  • Compare sets of objects up to at least 20 in each set using comparative language.
  • Use comparative language to describe two numbers up to 20 presented as written numerals.
  • Compose and decompose numbers up to 10 with objects and pictures.
  • Model the action of joining to represent addition and the action of separating to represent subtraction.
  • Solve word problems using objects and drawings to find sums up to 10 and differences within 10.
  • Explain the strategies used to solve problems involving adding and subtracting within 10 using spoken words, concrete and pictorial models, and number sentences.
  • Identify U.S. coins by name, including pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters.
  • Recite numbers up to at least 100 by ones and tens beginning with any given number.
  • Identify two-dimensional shapes, including circles, triangles, rectangles, and squares as special rectangles.
  • Identify three-dimensional solids, including cylinders, cones, spheres, and cubes, in the real world.
  • Identify two-dimensional components of three-dimensional objects.
  • Identify attributes of two-dimensional shapes using informal and formal geometric language interchangeably.
  • Classify and sort a variety of regular and irregular two- and three-dimensional figures regardless of orientation or size.
  • Create two-dimensional shapes using a variety of materials and drawings.
  • Give an example of a measurable attribute of a given object, including length, capacity, and weight.
  • Compare two objects with a common measurable attribute to see which object has more of/less of the attribute and describe the difference.
  • Collect, sort, and organize data into two or three categories.
  • Use data to create real-object and picture graphs.
  • Draw conclusions from real-object and picture graphs.
  • Identify ways to earn income.
  • Differentiate between money received as income and money received as gifts.
  • List simple skills required for jobs.
  • Distinguish between wants and needs and identify income as a source to meet one's wants and needs.

Kindergarten Science

Science Student Learning Profile

Kindergarten
In Kindergarten, students develop abilities necessary to do age-appropriate science inquiry in the field and the classroom. Students also practice critical thinking skills to explain a problem in his/her own words and propose a solution related to the problem. Ultimately, students gain a conceptual understanding of the pervading themes in science such as the nature of science, cycles and systems, properties, patterns and models, form and function, constancy and change.

Kindergarten Students:

  • Introduce the use of classroom and field investigations to help students develop the skills of asking questions, gathering information, communicating findings, and making informed decisions.
  • Demonstrate safe practices during classroom and field investigations.
  • Make observations and collect information using the senses. The use of hand lenses, balances, cups, bowls, computers and information technology are used as tools to support their investigations.
  • Identify, describe, and observe components of the natural world including rocks, soil, and water, and how these are useful resources for life on Earth.
  • Learn how to conserve resources and materials.
  • Observe and record changes in size, mass, color, position, quantity, time, temperature, sound and movement, and observe the weather, seasons, day and night, and growth as examples of change (ex. identify that the sun warms the air, that heat causes change, and compare objects according to temperature).
  • Identify and sort living organisms and objects.
  • Identify, sort, record, and manipulate parts of systems. Know how these components relate to each other and to the whole, and how manipulation of parts could result in the part or whole not working.

    Systems Include:

    Plants: including roots, stems, leaves, and flowers (ex. Could a plant function properly without roots? Could a plant grow properly without stems and leaves? Could a plant pollinate properly without flowers?)
    Animals: including wings, feet, heads, and tail
    Objects: including simple toys, vehicles, and construction sets (ex. cars without wheels)

  • Observe and identify the basic needs of living organisms (ex. food, water, shelter,space).
  • Observe and record changes in the life cycles of organisms, in their natural environment (ex. ladybug life cycle).
  • Observe and describe properties and patterns of organisms, objects, and events around them. Constancy and change occur in systems, and understanding patterns helps to predict what will happen next and can change over time.
  • Recognize models of objects and events as tools for understanding the natural world. Models can show how systems work, and students must also understand the limitations of the model.

Scientific Processes:

The first three TEKS at each grade level are processes essential for scientific investigation: safety in the classroom, field and laboratory experiences, scientific methods, and critical thinking. The fourth TEKS specifically lists the tools necessary for such investigations.

Scientific Concepts:

The remaining six TEKS are comprised of scientific concepts from three major strands that vertically align and build the basis for science literacy. The major strands include life, physical, and earth/space sciences.

Kindergarten Social Studies

Social Studies Student Learning Profile

Kindergarten

In Kindergarten, the focus is on the self, home, family, and classroom.

Kindergarten Students

  • Examine the celebrations of patriotic holidays and the contributions of historical people within our state and our nation.
  • Learn the basic concept of chronology
  • Discuss geographic concepts of location and physical and human characteristics of places.
  • Learn the basic human needs of food, clothing, and shelter and to ways that people meet these needs.
  • Learn the purpose of rules and the role of authority figures in the home and school.
  • Learn customs, symbols, and celebrations that represent American beliefs and principles and contribute to our national identity
  • Compare family customs and traditions and describe examples of technology in the home and school
  • Acquire information from a variety of oral and visual sources
  • Begin to use a variety of rich material such as biographies; folktales; myths; legends; poetry, songs, and artworks to learn from and to express themselves.

Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic values of our state and nation as referenced in the Texas Education Code, §28.002(h).

1st Grade Language Arts

Language Arts Student Learning Profile

1st Grade

In Grade 1, students continue to develop oral language and communication skills and move to becoming independent readers and writers.

First Grade Students:
  • listen attentively.
  • connect experiences and ideas with information and ideas presented in text.
  • listen and respond to children's literature from classic and contemporary works.
  • learn new vocabulary through stories and informational books read aloud.
  • recognize the distinguishing features of stories, poems, and informational texts.
  • continue to develop concepts of how print connects with spoken language.
  • understand that spoken language is composed of sequence of sounds.
  • understand that sounds are represented letters.
  • name the letters and know the order of the alphabet.
  • associate sounds with the letter or letters that represent them.
  • learn most of the common letter-sound correspondences.
  • use letter-sound correspondences to decode written words.
  • demonstrate comprehension by asking and answering questions and retelling stories.
  • demonstrate comprehension by predicting outcomes.
  • demonstrate comprehension by making and explaining inferences.
  • become adept writers.
  • know the difference between words, sentences, and paragraphs.
  • organize thoughts and ideas into complete stories or reports.
  • use subjects and verbs to write complete sentences.
  • use basic capitalization and punctuation when writing sentences .
  • become more proficient spellers of high-frequency words.
  • become more proficient spellers of words with regularly spelled patterns.
  • write messages that move from left-to-right and from top-to-bottom.
  • write with increasing control of penmanship.
  • regularly read in texts of appropriate difficulty with fluency and understanding.

1st Grade Math

Mathematics Student Learning Profile

1st Grade

Within a well-balanced mathematics curriculum, the primary focal points at First Grade are understanding and applying place value, solving problems involving addition and subtraction, and composing/decomposing two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional solids.

The student will:
  • Apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace.
  • Use a problem-solving model that incorporates formulating a plan or strategy, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution.
  • Select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems.
  • Communicate mathematical ideas and reasoning using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate.
  • Analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas.
  • Display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.
  • Recognize instantly the quantity of structured arrangements.
  • Use concrete and pictorial models to compose and decompose numbers up to 120 in more than one way as so many hundreds, so many tens, and so many ones.
  • Use objects, pictures, and expanded and standard forms to represent numbers up to 120.
  • Generate a number that is greater than or less than a given whole number up to 120.
  • Use place value to compare whole numbers up to 120 using comparative language.
  • Order whole numbers up to 120 using place value and open number lines.
  • Represent the comparison of two numbers to 100 using the symbols >, <, or=".
  • Use concrete and pictorial models to determine the sum of a multiple of 10 and a one-digit number in problems up to 99.
  • Use objects and pictorial models to solve word problems involving joining, separating, and comparing sets within 20 and unknowns as any one of the terms in the problem such as 2 + 4 = [ ]; 3 + [ ] = 7; and 5 = [ ] – 3.
  • Compose 10 with two or more addends with and without concrete objects.
  • Apply basic fact strategies to add and subtract within 20, including making 10 and decomposing a number leading to a 10.
  • Explain strategies used to solve addition and subtraction problems up to 20 using spoken words, objects, pictorial models, and number sentences.
  • Generate and solve problem situations when given a number sentence involving addition or subtraction of numbers within 20.
  • Identify U.S. coins, including pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters, by value and describe the relationships among them.
  • Write a number with the cent symbol to describe the value of a coin.
  • Use relationships to count by twos, fives, and tens to determine the value of a collection of pennies, nickels, and/or dimes.
  • Recite numbers forward and backward from any given number between 1 and 120.
  • Skip count by twos, fives, and tens to determine the total number of objects up to 120 in a set.
  • Use relationships to determine the number that is 10 more and 10 less than a given number up to 120.
  • Represent word problems involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers up to 20 using concrete and pictorial models and number sentences.
  • Understand that the equal sign represents a relationship where expressions on each side of the equal sign represent the same value(s).
  • Determine the unknown whole number in an addition or subtraction equation when the unknown may be any one of the three or four terms in the equation.
  • Apply properties of operations to add and subtract two or three numbers.
  • Classify and sort regular and irregular two-dimensional shapes based on attributes using informal geometric language.
  • Distinguish between attributes that define a two-dimensional or three-dimensional figure and attributes that do not define the shape.
  • Create two-dimensional figures, including circles, triangles, rectangles, and squares, as special rectangles, rhombuses, and hexagons.
  • Identify two-dimensional shapes, including circles, triangles, rectangles, and squares, as special rectangles, rhombuses, and hexagons and describe their attributes using formal geometric language.
  • Identify three-dimensional solids, including spheres, cones, cylinders, rectangular prisms (including cubes), and triangular prisms, and describe their attributes using formal geometric language.
  • Compose two-dimensional shapes by joining two, three, or four figures to produce a target shape in more than one way if possible.
  • Partition two-dimensional figures into two and four fair shares or equal parts and describe the parts using words.
  • Identify examples and non-examples of halves and fourths.
  • Use measuring tools to measure the length of objects to reinforce the continuous nature of linear measurement.
  • Illustrate that the length of an object is the number of same-size units of length that, when laid end-to-end with no gaps or overlaps, reach from one end of the object to the other.
  • Measure the same object/distance with units of two different lengths and describe how and why the measurements differ.
  • Describe a length to the nearest whole unit using a number and a unit.
  • Tell time to the hour and half hour using analog and digital clocks.
  • Collect, sort, and organize data in up to three categories using models/representations such as tally marks or T-charts.
  • Use data to create picture and bar-type graphs.
  • Draw conclusions and generate and answer questions using information from picture and bar-type graphs.
  • Define money earned as income.
  • Identify income as a means of obtaining goods and services, oftentimes making choices between wants and needs.
  • Distinguish between spending and saving.
  • Consider charitable giving.

1st Grade Science

Science Student Learning Profile

1st Grade

In Grade 1, students continue to develop science inquiry process skills in the field and in the classroom. They must also identify, predict, and create patterns in charts, graphs, and numerical representation. And, there is a greater emphasis on Earth science concepts including sources of water, rocks, soil, and how these are recycled.

1st Grade Students:

  • Demonstrate safe practices during classroom and field investigations.
  • Continue to develop the skills of asking questions, gathering information, communicating findings, and making informed decisions.
  • Make measurements of organisms and objects and parts of organisms and objects, using non-standard units, such as paper clips, hands, and pencils.
  • Collect information using hand lenses, clocks, computers, thermometers, and balances. Record and compare collected information.
  • Learn how to conserve resources and materials.
  • Observe, measure and record changes in size, mass, color, position, quantity, sound, and movement.
  • Identify and test ways that heat may cause change (ex. ice melting).
  • Observe, describe, and record changes in the environment such as in weather day to day, over seasons, and life cycles of organisms (ex. mealworms).
  • Sort organisms and objects according to their parts and characteristics. Observe and describe the parts of plants and animals. Identify parts of objects, that when put together, can do things they cannot do by themselves (ex. a working camera with film, a car moving with a motor, and an airplane flying with fuel).
  • Manipulate objects such as toys, vehicles, or construction sets so that the parts are separated from the whole which may result in the part or the whole not working.
  • Sort organisms, objects and events based on properties and patterns.
  • Identify, predict and create patterns in charts, graphs and numerical representation.
  • Compare and give examples of ways living organisms depend on each other for their basic needs (ex. food, water, shelter, space).
  • Recognize models of objects and events as tools for understanding the natural world. Models can show how systems work, and students must also understand the limitations of the model.
  • Identify and describe natural sources of water (streams, lakes and oceans), differences in rock and soil samples, and how rocks, soil, and water are used and recycled.

Scientific Processes:

The first three TEKS at each grade level are processes essential for scientific investigation: safety in the classroom, field and laboratory experiences, scientific methods, and critical thinking. The fourth TEKS specifically lists the tools necessary for such investigations.

Scientific Concepts:

The remaining six TEKS are comprised of scientific concepts from three major strands that vertically align and build the basis for science literacy. The major strands include life, physical, and earth/space sciences.

1st Grade Social Studies

Social Studies Student Learning Profile

1st Grade

In Grade 1, students learn about their relationship to the classroom, school, and community.

First Grade students:

  • Developed the concepts of time and chronology by distinguishing among past, present, and future events.
  • Identify anthems and mottoes of the United States and Texas.
  • Make simple maps to identify the location of places in the classroom, school, and community.
  • Discuss the concepts of goods and services and the value of work.
  • Identify historic figures and ordinary people who exhibit good citizenship.
  • Describe the importance of family customs and traditions.
  • Identify how technology has changed family life.
  • Sequence and categorize information.
  • Use a variety of rich material such as biographies; folktales; myths; legends; poetry, songs, and artworks to learn from and to express themselves.
Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation as referenced in the Texas Education Code, §28.002(h).

2nd Grade Language Arts

Language Arts Student Learning Profile

2nd Grade

In Grade 2, students read and write independently. Students have many opportunities to use spoken language.

Second Grade students:

  • understand there are different purposes for speaking and listening.
  • attract and hold attention of classmates when making announcements or sharing stories.
  • recognize a large number of words automatically.
  • use word identification strategies to figure out words not immediately recognized.
  • read texts from which they acquire new information.
  • summarize what they read.
  • represent ideas gained from reading with story maps, charts, and drawings.
  • use references, including dictionaries and glossaries.
  • revise and edit their own writing.
  • use appropriate capitalization and punctuation.
  • use singular and plural nouns.
  • adjust verbs for agreement.
  • write letters in penmanship that are properly formed.
  • write words in penmanship that are properly spaced.
  • write compositions that are legible.
  • begin to make simple notes and compile notes into outlines.
  • read regularly for understanding and fluency from classic and contemporary works.

2nd Grade Math

Mathematics Student Learning Profile

2nd Grade

Within a well-balanced mathematics curriculum, the primary focal points at Second Grade are making comparisons within the base-10 place value system, solving problems with addition and subtraction within 1,000, and building foundations for multiplication.

The student will:
  • Apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace.
  • Use a problem-solving model that incorporates formulating a plan or strategy, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution.
  • Select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems.
  • Communicate mathematical ideas and reasoning using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate.
  • Analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas.
  • Display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.
  • Use concrete and pictorial models to compose and decompose numbers up to 1,200 in more than one way as a sum of so many thousands, hundreds, tens, and ones.
  • Use standard, word, and expanded forms to represent numbers up to 1,200.
  • Generate a number that is greater than or less than a given whole number up to 1,200.
  • Use place value to compare and order whole numbers up to 1,200 using comparative language, numbers, and symbols (>, <, or=").
  • Locate the position of a given whole number on an open number line.
  • Name the whole number that corresponds to a specific point on a number line.
  • Partition objects into equal parts and name the parts, including halves, fourths, and eighths, using words.
  • Explain that the more fractional parts used to make a whole, the smaller the part; and the fewer the fractional parts, the larger the part.
  • Use concrete models to count fractional parts beyond one whole using words and recognize how many parts it takes to equal one whole.
  • Identify examples and non-examples of halves, fourths, and eighths.
  • Recall basic facts to add and subtract within 20 with automaticity.
  • Add up to four two-digit numbers and subtract two-digit numbers using mental strategies and algorithms based on knowledge of place value and properties of operations.
  • Solve one-step and multi-step word problems involving addition and subtraction within 1,000 using a variety of strategies based on place value, including algorithms.
  • Generate and solve problem situations for a given mathematical number sentence involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers within 1,000.
  • Determine the value of a collection of coins up to one dollar.
  • Use the cent symbol, dollar sign, and the decimal point to name the value of a collection of coins.
  • Model, create, and describe contextual multiplication situations in which equivalent sets of concrete objects are joined.
  • Model, create, and describe contextual division situations in which a set of concrete objects is separated into equivalent sets.
  • Determine whether a number up to 40 is even or odd using pairings of objects to represent the number.
  • Use an understanding of place value to determine the number that is 10 or 100 more or less than a given number up to 1,200.
  • Represent and solve addition and subtraction word problems where unknowns may be any one of the terms in the problem.
  • Create two-dimensional shapes based on given attributes, including number of sides and vertices.
  • Classify and sort three-dimensional solids, including spheres, cones, cylinders, rectangular prisms (including cubes as special rectangular prisms), and triangular prisms, based on attributes using formal geometric language.
  • Classify and sort polygons with 12 or fewer sides according to attributes, including identifying the number of sides and number of vertices.
  • Compose two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional solids with given properties or attributes.
  • Decompose two-dimensional shapes such as cutting out a square from a rectangle, dividing a shape in half, or partitioning a rectangle into identical triangles and identify the resulting geometric parts.
  • Find the length of objects using concrete models for standard units of length.
  • Describe the inverse relationship between the size of the unit and the number of units needed to equal the length of an object.
  • Represent whole numbers as distances from any given location on a number line.
  • Determine the length of an object to the nearest marked unit using rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, or measuring tapes.
  • Determine a solution to a problem involving length, including estimating lengths.
  • Use concrete models of square units to find the area of a rectangle by covering it with no gaps or overlaps, counting to find the total number of square units, and describing the measurement using a number and the unit.
  • Read and write time to the nearest one-minute increment using analog and digital clocks and distinguish between a.m. and p.m.
  • Explain that the length of a bar in a bar graph or the number of pictures in a pictograph represents the number of data points for a given category.
  • Organize a collection of data with up to four categories using pictographs and bar graphs with intervals of one or more.
  • Write and solve one-step word problems involving addition or subtraction using data represented within pictographs and bar graphs with intervals of one.
  • Draw conclusions and make predictions from information in a graph.
  • Calculate how money saved can accumulate into a larger amount over time.
  • Explain that saving is an alternative to spending.
  • Distinguish between a deposit and a withdrawal.
  • Identify examples of borrowing and distinguish between responsible and irresponsible borrowing.
  • Identify examples of lending and use concepts of benefits and costs to evaluate lending decisions.
  • Differentiate between producers and consumers and calculate the cost to produce a simple item.

2nd Grade Science

Science Student Learning Profile

2nd Grade

In Grade 2, students continue developing science inquiry process skills by conducting explanations and drawing conclusions. Measurements are made with standard units, and students learn to conserve resources with proper disposal of materials. Students compare results of lab investigations with what students and scientists know about the world. They distinguish between characteristics of organisms, in addition to identifying functions and measuring parts of plants and animals, using rulers and meter sticks. Changes are identified, analyzed, and recorded to explain force and motion, evaporation, weather, the night sky, and seasons. The water cycle, gases of the atmosphere, rocks and soil, and uses of other natural resources are also studied.

2nd Grade Students:

  • Demonstrate safe practices during classroom and field investigations.
  • Continue to develop the skills of asking questions, gathering information, communicating findings, drawing conclusions using information and prior knowledge.
  • Make decisions using information, and discuss and justify the merits of decisions.
  • Make measurements of organisms and objects and parts of organisms and objects, using standard and non-standard units, such as paper clips, hands, and pencils.
  • Collect information using rulers, meter sticks, measuring cups, hand lenses, clocks, computers, thermometers, and balances. Record and compare collected information.
  • Observe, measure, record, analyze, predict and illustrate changes in size, mass, temperature, color, position, quantity, sound, and movement.
  • Identify, predict and test uses of heat to cause change, such as melting and evaporation.
  • Observe, measure, and record changes in weather, the night sky, and seasons.
  • Demonstrate a change in motion of an object by giving the object a push or a pull.
  • Manipulate, predict and identify parts that when put together, can do things they cannot do by themselves (ex. guitar and guitar strings).
  • Manipulate, predict and identify parts that, when separated from the whole, may result in the part or the whole not working (ex. flashlights without batteries and plants without leaves).
  • Observe and record functions of plant and animal parts, and identify external characteristics of plants and animals that allow their needs to be met (ex. butterfly life cycle).
  • Compare and give examples of ways living organisms depend on each other for their basic needs (ex. food, water, shelter, space).
  • Classify and sequence organisms, objects and events based on properties and patterns.
  • Identify, predict, replicate, and create patterns including those seen in charts, graphs and number.
  • Recognize models of objects and events as tools for understanding the natural world. Models can show how systems work, and students must also understand the limitations of the model.
  • Describe and illustrate the water cycle, identify gases of the atmosphere, and know characteristics of rocks and soil.
  • Identify uses of natural resources.

Scientific Processes:

The first three TEKS at each grade level are processes essential for scientific investigation: safety in the classroom, field and laboratory experiences, scientific methods, and critical thinking. The fourth TEKS specifically lists the tools necessary for such investigations.

Scientific Concepts:

The remaining six TEKS are comprised of scientific concepts from three major strands that vertically align and build the basis for science literacy. The major strands include life, physical, and earth/space sciences.

2nd Grade Social Studies

Social Studies Student Learning Profile

2nd Grade

In Grade 2, students focus on a study of their local community by examining the impact of significant individuals and events on the history of the community as well as on the state and nation.

Second Grade Students

  • Develop the concepts of time and chronology by measuring calendar time by days, weeks, months, and years.
  • Begins to understand the relationship between physical environment and human activities.
  • Begins to understand the concepts of consumers and producers.
  • Make simple maps that distinguish between land and water including a key or legend.
  • Locate the state of Texas, the United States and North America on a map.
  • Identify by name the 7 continents and major oceans.
  • Identify functions of government as well as services provided by the local government.
  • Acquire knowledge of important customs, symbols, and celebrations that represent American beliefs and principles.
  • Identify the significance of works of art in the local community.
  • Explain how technological innovations have changed transportation and communication.
  • Communicate what they have learned in written, oral, and visual forms.
  • Use a variety of rich material such as biographies; folktales; myths; legends; and poetry, songs, and artworks to learn from and to express themselves.
Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation as referenced in the Texas Education Code, §28.002(h).

3rd Grade Language Arts

Language Arts Student Learning Profile

3rd Grade

In Grade 3, students read and write more independently than in any previous grade and spend significant blocks of time engaged in reading and writing on their own as well as in assigned tasks and projects.

Third Grade students:

  • listen critically to spoken messages.
  • think about their own contributions to discussions.
  • plan oral presentations.
  • use root words, prefixes, suffixes, and derivational endings to recognize words.
  • demonstrate knowledge of synonyms, antonyms, and multi-meaning words.
  • begin to distinguish fact from opinion in texts.
  • support their ideas and inferences by citing portions of text being discussed.
  • read a variety of genres from classic and contemporary works.
  • write with more complex capitalization and punctuation.
  • write with more proficient spelling of contractions and homonyms.
  • organize writing into larger units of text.
  • write several drafts to produce a final product.
  • revise their writing to improve coherence, progression and logic.
  • edit final drafts to reflect standard grammar and usage.
  • master manuscript writing and begin to use cursive writing.
  • read grade-level material fluently and with comprehension.

3rd Grade Math

Mathematics Student Learning Profile

3rd Grade

Within a well-balanced mathematics curriculum, the primary focal points at Grade 3 are place value, operations of whole numbers, and understanding fractional units.

The student will:
  • Compose and decompose numbers up to 100,000 as a sum of so many ten thousands, so many thousands, so many hundreds, so many tens, and so many ones using objects, pictorial models, and numbers, including expanded notation as appropriate.
  • Describe the mathematical relationships found in the base-10 place value system through the hundred thousands place.
  • Represent a number on a number line as being between two consecutive multiples of 10; 100; 1,000; or 10,000 and use words to describe relative size of numbers in order to round whole numbers.
  • Compare and order whole numbers up to 100,000 and represent comparisons using the symbols >, <, or=".
  • Represent fractions greater than zero and less than or equal to one with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 using concrete objects and pictorial models, including strip diagrams and number lines.
  • Determine the corresponding fraction greater than zero and less than or equal to one with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 given a specified point on a number line.
  • Explain that the unit fraction 1/b represents the quantity formed by one part of a whole that has been partitioned into b equal parts where b is a non-zero whole number.
  • Compose and decompose a fraction a/b with a numerator greater than zero and less than or equal to b as a sum of parts 1/b.
  • Solve problems involving partitioning an object or a set of objects among two or more recipients using pictorial representations of fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8.
  • Represent equivalent fractions with denominators of 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 using a variety of objects and pictorial models, including number lines.
  • Explain that two fractions are equivalent if and only if they are both represented by the same point on the number line or represent the same portion of a same size whole for an area model.
  • Compare two fractions having the same numerator or denominator in problems by reasoning about their sizes and justifying the conclusion using symbols, words, objects, and pictorial models.
  • Solve with fluency one-step and two-step problems involving addition and subtraction within 1,000 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and the relationship between addition and subtraction.
  • Round to the nearest 10 or 100 or use compatible numbers to estimate solutions to addition and subtraction problems.
  • Determine the value of a collection of coins and bills.
  • Determine the total number of objects when equally-sized groups of objects are combined or arranged in arrays up to 10 by 10.
  • Represent multiplication facts by using a variety of approaches such as repeated addition, equal-sized groups, arrays, area models, equal jumps on a number line, and skip counting.
  • Recall facts to multiply up to 10 by 10 with automaticity and recall the corresponding division facts.
  • Use strategies and algorithms, including the standard algorithm, to multiply a two-digit number by a one-digit number. Strategies may include mental math, partial products, and the commutative, associative, and distributive properties.
  • Determine the number of objects in each group when a set of objects is partitioned into equal shares or a set of objects is shared equally.
  • Determine if a number is even or odd using divisibility rules.
  • Determine a quotient using the relationship between multiplication and division.
  • Solve one-step and two-step problems involving multiplication and division within 100 using strategies based on objects; pictorial models, including arrays, area models, and equal groups; properties of operations; or recall of facts.
  • Represent one- and two-step problems involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers to 1,000 using pictorial models, number lines, and equations.
  • Represent and solve one- and two-step multiplication and division problems within 100 using arrays, strip diagrams, and equations.
  • Describe a multiplication expression as a comparison such as 3 x 24 represents 3 times as much as 24.
  • Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers when the unknown is either a missing factor or product.
  • Represent real-world relationships using number pairs in a table and verbal descriptions.
  • Classify and sort two- and three-dimensional figures, including cones, cylinders, spheres, triangular and rectangular prisms, and cubes, based on attributes using formal geometric language.
  • Use attributes to recognize rhombuses, parallelograms, trapezoids, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories.
  • Determine the area of rectangles with whole number side lengths in problems using multiplication related to the number of rows times the number of unit squares in each row.
  • Decompose composite figures formed by rectangles into non-overlapping rectangles to determine the area of the original figure using the additive property of area.
  • Decompose two congruent two-dimensional figures into parts with equal areas and express the area of each part as a unit fraction of the whole and recognize that equal shares of identical wholes need not have the same shape.
  • Represent fractions of halves, fourths, and eighths as distances from zero on a number line.
  • Determine the perimeter of a polygon or a missing length when given perimeter and remaining side lengths in problems.
  • Determine the solutions to problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes using pictorial models or tools such as a 15-minute event plus a 30-minute event equals 45 minutes.
  • Determine when it is appropriate to use measurements of liquid volume (capacity) or weight.
  • Determine liquid volume (capacity) or weight using appropriate units and tools.
  • Summarize a data set with multiple categories using a frequency table, dot plot, pictograph, or bar graph with scaled intervals.
  • Solve one- and two-step problems using categorical data represented with a frequency table, dot plot, pictograph, or bar graph with scaled intervals.
  • Explain the connection between human capital/labor and income.
  • Describe the relationship between the availability or scarcity of resources and how that impacts cost.
  • Identify the costs and benefits of planned and unplanned spending decisions.
  • Explain that credit is used when wants or needs exceed the ability to pay and that it is the borrower's responsibility to pay it back to the lender, usually with interest.
  • List reasons to save and explain the benefit of a savings plan, including for college.
  • Identify decisions involving income, spending, saving, credit, and charitable giving.
  • Apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace.
  • Use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution.
  • Select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems.
  • Communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate.
  • Create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas.
  • Analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas.
  • Display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.

3rd Grade Science

Science Student Learning Profile

3rd Grade

In Grade 3, students become self-reliant and begin making scientific hypotheses, inferences (ex. about product labeling), and evaluations during science inquiry labs. Students learn that repeated investigations may increase the reliability of results, in addition to constructing graphs, and organizing and evaluating information. They observe, measure, and record forces causing changes in objects and changes on the Earth, such as weathering, subsidence and earthquakes. They learn how matter has physical properties such as temperature and magnetism and they identify matter as solids, liquids, and gases. They observe and describe habitats and ecosystems and how environmental changes affect the objects and organisms within those ecosystems. Students also begin to identify species and adaptations within those species for survival and simple concepts related to reproduction. Microscope skills are also introduced, as well as the use of safety goggles, magnets, compasses, sound recorders, calculators, and contributions of scientists.

3rd Grade Students:

  • Demonstrate safe practices during classroom and field investigations, and make wise choices in the use and conservation of resources and the disposal or recycling of materials.
  • Plan and implement descriptive investigations to develop the skills of asking well-defined questions, formulating testable hypotheses, and selecting appropriate lab equipment.
  • Analyze and interpret information to construct reasonable explanations from direct and indirect evidence.
  • Analyze, review, and critique scientific explanations as to their strengths and weaknesses using scientific evidence and information.
  • Collect and analyze information using tools such as safety goggles, microscopes, thermometers, hand lenses, meter sticks, rulers, balances, magnets, compasses, cameras, calculators, sound recorders, clocks, and computers.
  • Observe and identify simple systems, such as a sprouted seed and a wooden toy car. Describe the role of the various parts of a simple system, such as a yo-yo and string.
  • Identify the physical properties of matter using tools to gather information regarding temperature, magnetism, hardness, gravity, and mass.
  • Identify matter as solids, liquids, and gases.
  • Identify and record properties of soils such as color and texture, capacity to retain water, and ability to support plant growth.
  • Identify the importance of components of the natural world including rocks, soils, water, and atmospheric gases, and classify them as renewable, nonrenewable, and inexhaustible resources.
  • Identify planets in our solar system and their position in relation to the Sun, and describe characteristics of the Sun.
  • Observe the direction and position of objects as they are pushed and pulled.
  • Recognize that forces, as examples of change, cause movement on the Earth's surface (ex. glaciers, weathering, subsidence, and earthquakes).
  • Explore organisms' needs (food, water, shelter, space, disposal of wastes), habitats, and competition with other organisms within their ecosystem.
  • Analyze the importance of adaptive characteristics for a species to survive and reproduce within that ecosystem.
  • Identify some inherited traits of plants and animals, in addition to simple concepts related to reproduction.
  • Describe how organisms modify their physical environment to meet their needs (ex. beavers building a dam or humans building a home).
  • Describe environmental changes that cause organisms to thrive, become ill, or perish.
  • Recognize models of objects and events as tools for understanding the natural world. Models can show how systems work, and students must also understand the limitations of the model.

Scientific Processes:

The first three TEKS at each grade level are processes essential for scientific investigation: safety in the classroom, field and laboratory experiences, scientific methods, and critical thinking. The fourth TEKS specifically lists the tools necessary for such investigations.

Scientific Concepts:

The remaining seven TEKS are comprised of scientific concepts from three major strands that vertically align and build the basis for science literacy. The major strands include life, physical, and earth/space sciences.

3rd Grade Social Studies

Social Studies Student Learning Profile

3rd Grade

In Grade 3, students learn how individuals have changed their communities and world. Students study the effects inspiring heroes have had on communities, past and present.

Third Grade Students

  • Learn about the lives of heroic men and women who made important choices, overcame obstacles, sacrificed for the betterment of others, and embarked on journeys that resulted in new ideas, new inventions, and new communities.
  • Expand their knowledge through the identification and study of people who made a difference, influenced public policy and decision making, and participated in resolving issues that are important to all people.
  • Develop an understanding of the economic, cultural, and scientific contributions made by individuals.
  • Make a variety of maps distinguishing between land and water. The map also should include a key and/or legend.
  • Understand the concept of scale.
  • Locate their hometown, state of Texas, the United States and North America on a map.
  • Identify by name and location the 7 continents and major oceans.
  • Use a variety of rich material such as biographies; folktales; myths; legends; and poetry, songs, and artworks to learn from and to express themselves.
Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation as referenced in the Texas Education Code, §28.002(h).

4th Grade Language Arts

Language Arts Student Learning Profile

4th Grade

In Grade 4, students spend significant blocks of time engaged in reading and writing independently.

Fourth Grade students:

  • listen critically and analyze a speaker's intent such as to entertain or to persuade.
  • adapt their language when speaking to the audience, purpose, and occasion.
  • adjust their reading approach to various forms of texts.
  • expand their vocabulary systematically across the curriculum.
  • paraphrase text.
  • connect, compare, and contrast ideas.
  • identify and follow text structures such as chronologies and cause and effect.
  • produce summaries of text.
  • engage in more sophisticated analysis of characters, plots, and settings.
  • select and use different forms of writing to inform, persuade, or entertain.
  • write with style and voice.
  • write in complete sentences.
  • vary sentence structure.
  • edit their writing based on the conventions of written language.
  • understand and use visual media.
  • compare and contrast visual media to print.
  • read for meaning with a growing interest in a wide variety of topics.
  • continue to read classic and contemporary selections.
  • produce a final, polished copy of a written composition.

4th Grade Math

Mathematics Student Learning Profile

4th Grade

Within a well-balanced mathematics curriculum, the primary focal points at Grade 4 are use of operations, fractions, and decimals and describing and analyzing geometry and measurement.

The student will:

  • Interpret the value of each place-value position as 10 times the position to the right and as one-tenth of the value of the place to its left.
  • Represent the value of the digit in whole numbers through 1,000,000,000 and decimals to the hundredths using expanded notation and numerals.
  • Compare and order whole numbers to 1,000,000,000 and represent comparisons using the symbols >, <, or=".
  • Round whole numbers to a given place value through the hundred thousands place.
  • Represent decimals, including tenths and hundredths, using concrete and visual models and money.
  • Compare and order decimals using concrete and visual models to the hundredths.
  • Relate decimals to fractions that name tenths and hundredths.
  • Determine the corresponding decimal to the tenths or hundredths place of a specified point on a number line.
  • Represent a fraction a/b as a sum of fractions 1/b, where a and b are whole numbers and b > 0, including when a > b.
  • Decompose a fraction in more than one way into a sum of fractions with the same denominator using concrete and pictorial models and recording results with symbolic representations.
  • Determine if two given fractions are equivalent using a variety of methods.
  • Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators and represent the comparison using the symbols >, =, or <.
  • Represent and solve addition and subtraction of fractions with equal denominators using objects and pictorial models that build to the number line and properties of operations.
  • Evaluate the reasonableness of sums and differences of fractions using benchmark fractions 0, 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, and 1, referring to the same whole.
  • Represent fractions and decimals to the tenths or hundredths as distances from zero on a number line.
  • Add and subtract whole numbers and decimals to the hundredths place using the standard algorithm.
  • Determine products of a number and 10 or 100 using properties of operations and place value understandings.
  • Represent the product of 2 two-digit numbers using arrays, area models, or equations, including perfect squares through 15 by 15.
  • Use strategies and algorithms, including the standard algorithm, to multiply up to a four-digit number by a one-digit number and to multiply a two-digit number by a two-digit number. Strategies may include mental math, partial products, and the commutative, associative, and distributive properties.
  • Represent the quotient of up to a four-digit whole number divided by a one-digit whole number using arrays, area models, or equations.
  • Use strategies and algorithms, including the standard algorithm, to divide up to a four-digit dividend by a one-digit divisor.
  • Round to the nearest 10, 100, or 1,000 or use compatible numbers to estimate solutions involving whole numbers.
  • Solve with fluency one- and two-step problems involving multiplication and division, including interpreting remainders.
  • Represent multi-step problems involving the four operations with whole numbers using strip diagrams and equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity.
  • Represent problems using an input-output table and numerical expressions to generate a number pattern that follows a given rule representing the relationship of the values in the resulting sequence and their position in the sequence.
  • Use models to determine the formulas for the perimeter of a rectangle (l + w + l + w or 2l + 2w), including the special form for perimeter of a square (4s) and the area of a rectangle (l x w).
  • Solve problems related to perimeter and area of rectangles where dimensions are whole numbers.
  • Identify points, lines, line segments, rays, angles, and perpendicular and parallel lines.
  • Identify and draw one or more lines of symmetry, if they exist, for a two-dimensional figure.
  • Apply knowledge of right angles to identify acute, right, and obtuse triangles.
  • Classify two-dimensional figures based on the presence or absence of parallel or perpendicular lines or the presence or absence of angles of a specified size.
  • Illustrate the measure of an angle as the part of a circle whose center is at the vertex of the angle that is "cut out" by the rays of the angle. Angle measures are limited to whole numbers.
  • Illustrate degrees as the units used to measure an angle, where 1/360 of any circle is one degree and an angle that "cuts" n/360 out of any circle whose center is at the angle's vertex has a measure of n degrees. Angle measures are limited to whole numbers.
  • Determine the approximate measures of angles in degrees to the nearest whole number using a protractor.
  • Draw an angle with a given measure.
  • Determine the measure of an unknown angle formed by two non-overlapping adjacent angles given one or both angle measures.
  • Identify relative sizes of measurement units within the customary and metric systems.
  • Convert measurements within the same measurement system, customary or metric, from a smaller unit into a larger unit or a larger unit into a smaller unit when given other equivalent measures represented in a table.
  • Solve problems that deal with measurements of length, intervals of time, liquid volumes, mass, and money using addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division as appropriate.
  • Represent data on a frequency table, dot plot, or stem-and-leaf plot marked with whole numbers and fractions.
  • Solve one- and two-step problems using data in whole number, decimal, and fraction form in a frequency table, dot plot, or stem-and-leaf plot.
  • Distinguish between fixed and variable expenses.
  • Calculate profit in a given situation.
  • Compare the advantages and disadvantages of various savings options.
  • Describe how to allocate a weekly allowance among spending; saving, including for college; and sharing.
  • Describe the basic purpose of financial institutions, including keeping money safe, borrowing money, and lending.
  • Apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace.
  • Use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution.
  • Select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems.
  • Communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate.
  • Create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas.
  • Analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas.
  • Display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.

4th Grade Science

Science Student Learning Profile

4th Grade

In Grade 4, students identify and describe complex systems and predict what happens when parts of a system are removed. Matter and its physical properties are tested, comparing data about states of matter, conduction, density, and buoyancy. Students learn how adaptations may increase survival in past and present species. They observe likenesses and differences within offspring to distinguish between inherited traits and learned characteristics. They identify that certain past events affect present and future events using fossils, and changes in growth, erosion, dissolving, weathering and flow. They test properties of soils and summarize the effects of the oceans on land. Students also identify the Sun as the major source of energy for the Earth. And like Grade 3, they continue to perform inquiry labs and learn that repeated investigations may increase the reliability of results, in addition to constructing graphs.

4th Grade Students:

  • Demonstrate safe practices during classroom and field investigations, and make wise choices in the use and conservation of resources and the disposal or recycling of materials.
  • Plan and implement descriptive investigations to develop the skills of asking well-defined questions, formulating testable hypotheses, and selecting and using lab equipment and technology.
  • Analyze and interpret information to construct reasonable explanations from direct and indirect evidence.
  • Analyze, review, and critique scientific explanations as to their strengths and weaknesses using scientific evidence and information.
  • Draw inferences from labels and evaluate the impact of research on scientific thought, society, and the environment.
  • Collect and analyze information using tools such as safety goggles, microscopes, thermometers, hand lenses, meter sticks, rulers, balances, magnets, compasses, cameras, calculators, sound recorders, timing devices, and computers.
  • Identify patterns of change such as weather, metamorphosis (ex. hatching of tadpoles), and objects in the night sky.
  • Illustrate characteristics that remain constant even when the object is rotated like a spinning top, translated like a skater moving in a straight line, or reflected on a smooth surface.
  • Use reflections (ex. a mirror) to verify that a natural object has symmetry.
  • Test properties of soil (texture, capacity to retain water, ability to support life), and summarize the effects of the oceans on land.
  • Identify the role of the Sun as our major source of energy, and understand the Sun's role in growth of plants, creations of winds, and in the water cycle.
  • Identify and test the physical properties of matter and observe the addition or reduction of heat as an example of what can cause changes in states of matter.
  • Conduct tests, compare data, and draw conclusions about physical properties of matter including states of matter, conduction, density, and buoyancy.
  • Identify and observe effects of events that require time for changes to be noticeable including growth, erosion, dissolving, weathering, and flow.
  • Draw conclusions about "what happened before" using fossils, charts and tables.
  • Identify and describe complex systems (living and nonliving) and predict what happens when parts are removed.
  • Identify and describe roles of living organisms in living systems, such as plants in a schoolyard, and parts of nonliving systems such as a light bulb in a circuit.
  • Identify external characteristics of organisms that allow their needs to be met.
  • Compare adaptations of various species, and learn how adaptations may increase survival in past and present species.
  • Gather information to identify the diversity of organisms that lived in the past and compare them to existing species of today.
  • Observe likenesses and differences within offspring to distinguish between inherited and learned traits.
  • Connect Grade 4 science concepts with the history of science and contributions of scientists.
  • Recognize models of objects and events as tools for understanding the natural world. Models can show how systems work, and students must also understand the limitations of the model.

Scientific Processes:

The first three TEKS at each grade level are processes essential for scientific investigation: safety in the classroom, field and laboratory experiences, scientific methods, and critical thinking. The fourth TEKS specifically lists the tools necessary for such investigations.

Scientific Concepts:

The remaining seven TEKS are comprised of scientific concepts from three major strands that vertically align and build the basis for science literacy. The major strands include life, physical, and earth/space sciences.

4th Grade Social Studies

Social Studies Student Learning Profile

4th Grade

In Grade 4 , students examine the history of Texas from the early beginnings to the present within the context of influences of the Western Hemisphere.

Fourth Grade students:

  • Understand the historical content that focuses on Texas history including the Texas revolution, establishment of the Republic of Texas, and subsequent annexation to the United States.
  • Discuss important issues, events, and individuals of the 19th and 20th centuries.
  • Conduct a thorough study of regions in Texas and the Western Hemisphere that result from human activity and from physical features.
  • Discuss the location, distribution, and patterns of economic activities and of settlement in Texas.
  • Discuss the concept of regions.
  • Describe how early Native Americans in Texas and the Western Hemisphere met their basic economic needs.
  • Identify economic motivations for European exploration and colonization and reasons for the establishment of Spanish missions.
  • Explain how Native Americans governed themselves.
  • Identify characteristics of Spanish and Mexican colonial governments in Texas.
  • Recite and explain the meaning of the Pledge to the Texas Flag.
  • Identify the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to Texas.
  • Describe the impact of science and technology on life in the state.
  • Use critical-thinking skills to identify cause-and-effect relationships, compare and contrast, and make generalizations and predictions.
  • Use a variety of rich primary and secondary source material such as biographies; novels; speeches and letters; and poetry, songs, and artworks to learn from and express themselves.
Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation as referenced in the Texas Education Code, §28.002(h).

5th Grade Language Arts

Language Arts Student Learning Profile

5th Grade

In Grade 5, students refine and master previously learned knowledge and skills in increasingly complex presentations, reading selections, and written compositions.

Fifth Grade students:

  • identify a speaker's persuasive technique.
  • judge the internal consistency or logic of stories and texts.
  • recognize the way an author organizes information.
  • engage in more sophisticated analysis of characters, plots, and settings.
  • select and use different forms of writing to inform, persuade, or entertain.
  • vary sentence structure.
  • use conjunctions to connect ideas.
  • use literary devices such as suspense, dialogue, and figurative language in their writing.
  • edit their writing based on their knowledge of conventions of written language.
  • search out multiple texts to complete research reports or projects.
  • read from classic and contemporary selections and informational text.
  • produce final, error-free pieces of written composition on a regular basis.

5th Grade Math

Mathematics Student Learning Profile

5th Grade
Within a well-balanced mathematics curriculum, the primary focal points at Grade 5 are solving problems involving all four operations with positive rational numbers, determining and generating formulas and solutions to expressions, and extending measurement to area and volume.

The student will:

  • Represent the value of the digit in decimals through the thousandths using expanded notation and numerals.
  • Compare and order two decimals to thousandths and represent comparisons using the symbols >, <, or=".
  • Round decimals to tenths or hundredths.
  • Estimate to determine solutions to mathematical and real-world problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division.
  • Multiply with fluency a three-digit number by a two-digit number using the standard algorithm.
  • Solve with proficiency for quotients of up to a four-digit dividend by a two-digit divisor using strategies and the standard algorithm.
  • Represent multiplication of decimals with products to the hundredths using objects and pictorial models, including area models.
  • Solve for products of decimals to the hundredths, including situations involving money, using strategies based on place-value understandings, properties of operations, and the relationship to the multiplication of whole numbers.
  • Represent quotients of decimals to the hundredths, up to four-digit dividends and two-digit whole number divisors, using objects and pictorial models, including area models.
  • Solve for quotients of decimals to the hundredths, up to four-digit dividends and two-digit whole number divisors, using strategies and algorithms, including the standard algorithm.
  • Represent and solve addition and subtraction of fractions with unequal denominators referring to the same whole using objects and pictorial models and properties of operations.
  • Represent and solve multiplication of a whole number and a fraction that refers to the same whole using objects and pictorial models, including area models.
  • Represent division of a unit fraction by a whole number and the division of a whole number by a unit fraction such as 1/3 ÷ 7 and 7 ÷ 1/3 using objects and pictorial models, including area models.
  • Add and subtract positive rational numbers fluently.
  • Divide whole numbers by unit fractions and unit fractions by whole numbers.
  • Identify prime and composite numbers.
  • Represent and solve multi-step problems involving the four operations with whole numbers using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity.
  • Generate a numerical pattern when given a rule in the form y = ax or y = x + a and graph.
  • Recognize the difference between additive and multiplicative numerical patterns given in a table or graph.
  • Describe the meaning of parentheses and brackets in a numeric expression.
  • Simplify numerical expressions that do not involve exponents, including up to two levels of grouping.
  • Use concrete objects and pictorial models to develop the formulas for the volume of a rectangular prism, including the special form for a cube (V = l x w x h, V = s x s x s, and V = Bh).
  • Represent and solve problems related to perimeter and/or area and related to volume.
  • Recognize a cube with side length of one unit as a unit cube having one cubic unit of volume and the volume of a three-dimensional figure as the number of unit cubes (n cubic units) needed to fill it with no gaps or overlaps if possible.
  • Determine the volume of a rectangular prism with whole number side lengths in problems related to the number of layers times the number of unit cubes in the area of the base.
  • Solve problems by calculating conversions within a measurement system, customary or metric.
  • Describe the key attributes of the coordinate plane, including perpendicular number lines (axes) where the intersection (origin) of the two lines coincides with zero on each number line and the given point (0, 0); the x-coordinate, the first number in an ordered pair, indicates movement parallel to the x-axis starting at the origin; and the y-coordinate, the second number, indicates movement parallel to the y-axis starting at the origin.
  • Describe the process for graphing ordered pairs of numbers in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane.
  • Graph in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane ordered pairs of numbers arising from mathematical and real-world problems, including those generated by number patterns or found in an input-output table.
  • Represent categorical data with bar graphs or frequency tables and numerical data, including data sets of measurements in fractions or decimals, with dot plots or stem-and-leaf plots.
  • Represent discrete paired data on a scatterplot.
  • Solve one- and two-step problems using data from a frequency table, dot plot, bar graph, stem-and-leaf plot, or scatterplot.
  • Define income tax, payroll tax, sales tax, and property tax.
  • Explain the difference between gross income and net income.
  • Identify the advantages and disadvantages of different methods of payment, including check, credit card, debit card, and electronic payments.
  • Develop a system for keeping and using financial records.
  • Describe actions that might be taken to balance a budget when expenses exceed income.
  • Balance a simple budget.
  • Apply mathematics to problems arising in everyday life, society, and the workplace.
  • Use a problem-solving model that incorporates analyzing given information, formulating a plan or strategy, determining a solution, justifying the solution, and evaluating the problem-solving process and the reasonableness of the solution.
  • Select tools, including real objects, manipulatives, paper and pencil, and technology as appropriate, and techniques, including mental math, estimation, and number sense as appropriate, to solve problems.
  • Communicate mathematical ideas, reasoning, and their implications using multiple representations, including symbols, diagrams, graphs, and language as appropriate.
  • Create and use representations to organize, record, and communicate mathematical ideas.
  • Analyze mathematical relationships to connect and communicate mathematical ideas.
  • Display, explain, and justify mathematical ideas and arguments using precise mathematical language in written or oral communication.

5th Grade Science

Science Student Learning Profile

5th Grade

During the spring semester, students will a take a state assessment examination called the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) Test, which provides a snapshot of students' understanding of Science TEKS from Grades 3, 4 and 5. It is a forty-question test composed of the major concept strands of life, physical, and earth/space sciences.

In Grade 5, students expand on how a system is a collection of processes that interact. They observe and measure constant properties of everyday substances such as boiling points and melting points. They differentiate among forms of light, heat, electrical, and solar energy. They identify changes that occur in the physical properties of ingredients of solutions such as dissolving sugar in water. Students now interpret how landforms are the result of a combination of constructive and destructive forces. Past and present events that affect the future help students understand the formation of Earth's renewable, non-renewable, and inexhaustible resources. Gravity, gravitational forces in the solar system, and the physical characteristics of the Earth, are also identified and compared. And like Grade 4, they learn that repeated investigations during their inquiry labs may increase the reliability of results, in addition to constructing graphs, and organizing and evaluating information.

5th Grade Students:

  • Demonstrate safe practices during classroom and field investigations, and make wise choices in the use and conservation of resources and the disposal or recycling of materials.
  • Plan and implement descriptive and simple experimental investigations including asking well-defined questions, formulating testable hypotheses, and selecting and using appropriate lab equipment and technology.
  • Analyze and interpret information to construct reasonable explanations from direct and indirect evidence.
  • Analyze, review, and critique scientific explanations as to their strengths and weaknesses using scientific evidence and information.
  • Draw inferences from labels and evaluate the impact of research on scientific thought, society, and the environment.
  • Collect and analyze information using tools such as safety goggles, microscopes, thermometers, hand lenses, meter sticks, rulers, balances, magnets, compasses, cameras, calculators, computers, sound recorders, timing devices, and collecting nets.
  • Describe cycles (ex. water, nitrogen, carbon-oxygen, lunar, seasonal), structures (ex. physical characteristics of Earth and moon), and processes (ex. erosion, weathering, dissolving, and the formation of coal, oil, gas and minerals), and describe interactions in a simple system.
  • Classify matter based on physical properties including magnetism, physical state, ability to conduct or insulate heat, electricity, and sound.
  • Identify structures and functions of Earth systems including the crust, mantle, and core, and the effect of weathering on landforms. Landforms are the result of constructive and destructive forces such as deposition of sediment and weathering.
  • Identify physical characteristics of Earth, as compared to the moon.
  • Learn that growth, erosion, and dissolving are examples of how some past events have affected present events.
  • Draw conclusions about what happened before" using data such as tree-growth rings and sedimentary rock sequences.
  • Identify the properties used to classify matter such as magnetism, physical states of matter, and conductivity.
  • Differentiate among forms of energy including light, heat, electrical, and solar energy.
  • Identify and demonstrate how light is reflected (ex. tinted windows) and refracted (ex. cameras, telescopes, eyeglasses).
  • Demonstrate that electricity can flow in a circuit and produce heat, light, sound, and magnetic effects.
  • Verify that a vibrating object can produce sound.
  • Describe and compare life cycles of plants and animals.
  • Compare how adaptive characteristics can improve the survival of a species, and analyze and describe the characteristics that result in an organism's unique niche.
  • Predict some adaptive characteristics required for survival and reproduction by an organism in an ecosystem.
  • Explore a variety of traits that are inherited by offspring from their parents and study examples of learned characteristics that result from influence of the environment.
  • Connect Grade 5 science concepts with the history of science and contributions of scientists.
  • Recognize models of objects and events as tools for understanding the natural world. Models can show how systems work, and students must also understand the limitations of the model.

Scientific Processes:

The first three TEKS at each grade level are processes essential for scientific investigation: safety in the classroom, field and laboratory experiences, scientific methods, and critical thinking. The fourth TEKS specifically lists the tools necessary for such investigations.

Scientific Concepts:

The remaining eight TEKS are comprised of scientific concepts from three major strands that vertically align and build the basis for science literacy. The major strands include life, physical, and earth/space sciences.

5th Grade Social Studies

Social Studies Student Learning Profile

5th Grade
In Grade 5 , students learn about the history of the United States from its early beginnings to the present with a focus on colonial times through the 20th century.

Fifth Grade students:

  • Recite and explain the meaning of the Pledge of Allegiance.
  • Memorize all 50 states and capitals, along with major mountain ranges and rivers of the United States.
  • Examine the importance of effective leadership in a democratic society and identify important leaders in the national government.
  • Focus on the political, economic, and social events and issues related to the colonial and revolutionary eras, the creation and ratification of the U.S. Constitution, challenges of the early Republic, westward expansion, sectionalism, Civil War, and Reconstruction.
  • Discuss key events surrounding the American Revolution, founding of our Democratic government, Westward expansion, Civil War and 20th century events.
  • Examine fundamental rights guaranteed in the Bill of Rights.
  • Describe customs and celebrations of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups in the nation.
  • Identify the contributions of famous inventors and scientists.
  • Use critical-thinking skills, including sequencing, categorizing, and summarizing information and drawing inferences and conclusions.
  • U se a variety of rich primary and secondary source material such as biographies; novels; speeches and letters; and poetry, songs, and artworks to learn from and express themselves.

6th Grade Language Arts

Language Arts Student Learning Profile

6th Grade

In Grade 6, students master previously learned skills in increasingly complex presentations, reading selections, and written compositions.

Sixth Grade Students

  • take notes during oral presentations.
  • organize and summarize spoken messages.
  • evaluate their own oral presentations.
  • understand idioms, multi-meaning words, and analogies in text.
  • distinguish denotative and connotative meanings of words.
  • use word origins as an aid to understand historical influences on word meaning.
  • use study strategies to learn and recall important ideas.
  • recognize literary devices such as flashback, foreshadowing, and symbolism.
  • select and use different forms of writing to inform, persuade, or entertain.
  • vary sentence structure.
  • use more complex punctuation such as hyphens, semicolons, and possessives.
  • edit their writing based on conventions of written language.
  • search out multiple texts to complete research reports and projects.
  • evaluate the purposes and effects of film, print, and technology presentations.
  • assess how language, medium, and presentation contribute to meaning.
  • read classic and contemporary selections and informational text.
  • produce final, error-free pieces of written composition.

6th Grade Math

Mathematics Student Learning Profile

6th Grade

Within a well-balanced mathematics curriculum, the primary focal points at Grade 6 are using ratios to describe proportional relationships involving number, geometry, measurement, and probability and adding and subtracting decimals and fractions.

The student will:

  • ·Compare and order rational numbers (whole numbers, fractions, and decimals) and generate equivalent forms.
  • Use integers to represent real-life situations.
  • Write prime factorizations using exponents.
  • Identify factors and multiples including common factors and common multiples.
  • Model and solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions and decimals.
  • Solve word problems using multiplication and division of whole numbers including situations with equivalent ratios and rates.
  • Estimate using rounding, compatible numbers, and number sense.
  • Represent ratios and percents with concrete models, fractions and decimals.
  • Solve problems involving proportional relationships and make predictions using ratios.
  • Use letters as variables in mathematical expressions to describe how one quantity changes when a related quantity changes (conversions, area and perimeter, formulas for area and perimeter, volume).
  • Use letters to represent an unknown in an equation from a word problem.
  • Use geometric vocabulary to describe angles, polygons, and circles.
  • Measure and classify angles (acute, obtuse, right) and identify relationships involving angles in polygons.
  • Describe the relationship between radius, diameter, and circumference of a circle.
  • Locate and name points on a coordinate plane using ordered pairs of non-negative rational numbers.
  • · Solve application problems involving estimation and measurement of length, area, time, temperature, capacity, weight, and angles.
  • Convert measures within the same measurement system.
  • Construct sample spaces using lists, tree diagrams, and combinations.
  • Find the probability of a simple event and its complement and describe the relationship between the two.
  • Use median, mode, and range to describe data.
  • Draw and compare different graphical representations of the same data, including circle graphs.
  • Use tools such as real objects, manipulatives, and technology to solve problems.
  • Communicate about mathematics using informal language, objects, words, pictures, numbers, and technology.
  • Use logical reasoning to make sense of his or her world and justify why an answer is reasonable.
  • Make generalizations from patterns or sets of examples and non-examples.

6th Grade Science

Science Student Learning Profile

6th Grade

In Grade 6, students take a quantum leap toward using various types of lab equipment for inquiry labs. Students also learn to combine systems to describe how the properties of a system are different than the parts within the system. Force and motion (ex. volcanic activity, uplifting, and movements of water) are demonstrated, measured, and graphically represented. Students classify new substances that are chemically combined by physical and chemical properties. Energy transformations including photosynthesis, food chains and food webs are explained and illustrated. Structure and function in living systems such as cells are identified and differentiated. The role of genes is studied as well as the identification of natural and selective breeding. Students identify internal and external stimuli response in organisms (ex. hunger or thirst) and the components of an ecosystem to which organisms may respond such as presence or absence of heat or light. They now study all components of our solar system and space travel. Students learn about Earth systems including the rock cycle, surface and groundwater cycles, watersheds, components of the atmosphere (oxygen, nitrogen, and water vapor), and they also identify the role of atmospheric movement in weather changes. And like Grade 5, they learn that repeated investigations during inquiry labs may increase the reliability of results. In addition, computers are used to construct graphs, and organize and evaluate data. Patterns are identified using percent, average, range, and frequency.

6th Grade Students:

  • Demonstrate safe practices during classroom and field investigations, and make wise choices in the use and conservation of resources and the disposal or recycling of materials.
  • Plan and implement investigative procedures including asking well-defined questions, formulating testable hypotheses, and selecting and using appropriate lab equipment and technology.
  • Analyze and interpret information to construct reasonable explanations from direct and indirect evidence.
  • Analyze, review, and critique scientific explanations as to their strengths and weaknesses using scientific evidence and information.
  • Draw inferences from labels and evaluate the impact of research on scientific thought, society, and the environment.
  • Collect, analyze, and record information using tools such as beakers, petri dishes, meter sticks, graduated cylinders, weather instruments, timing devices, hot plates, test tubes, safety goggles, spring scales, magnets, balances, microscopes, telescopes, thermometers, calculators, field equipment, compasses, computers, and computer probes.
  • Identify patterns in collected information using percent, average, range, and frequency.
  • Identify components of the solar system including the Sun, planets, moons, meteorites, comets, and asteroids and learn how seasons and the length of the day are caused by the tilt and rotation of the Earth as it orbits the Sun.
  • Describe types of equipment and transportation needed for space travel.
  • Summarize the rock cycle.
  • Identify sources of water in a watershed.
  • Identify changes in objects including position, direction, and speed when acted upon by a force. Demonstrate that changes in motion can be measured and graphically represented.
  • Identify forces that shape the Earth (ex. uplifting, movement of water, and volcanic activity).
  • Classify substances by their physical and chemical properties, and compare the properties of new substances to that of the original substances.
  • Identify the water cycle and decay of biomass (ex. compost bin) as examples of the interactions between matter and energy.
  • Identify life processes and the relationships between structure and function of organisms. Know how structure complements function at different levels of organization including organs, organ systems, organisms, and populations.
  • Describe energy flow in living systems including food chains and food webs.
  • Determine that all organisms are composed of cells.
  • Connect Grade 6 science concepts with the history of science and contributions of scientists.
  • Recognize models of objects and events as tools for understanding the natural world. Models can show how systems work, and students must also understand the limitations of the model.

Scientific Processes:

The first three TEKS at each grade level are processes essential for scientific investigation: safety in the classroom, field and laboratory experiences, scientific methods, and critical thinking. The fourth TEKS specifically lists the tools necessary for such investigations.

Scientific Concepts:

The remaining ten TEKS are comprised of scientific concepts from three major strands that vertically align and build the basis for science literacy. The major strands include life, physical, and earth/space sciences.

6th Grade Social Studies

Social Studies Student Learning Profile

6th Grade

In Grade 6 , students study people and places of the contemporary world. Societies selected for study are chosen from the following regions of the world: Europe, Russia and the Eurasian republics, North America, Middle America, South America, Southwest Asia-North Africa, Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asia, Australia, and the Pacific Realm.

Sixth Grade students:

  • Describe the influence of individuals and groups on historical and contemporary events in those societies.
  • Identify the locations and geographic characteristics of selected societies.
  • Describe the nature of citizenship in various societies.
  • Identify different ways of organizing economic and governmental systems. (The concepts of limited and unlimited governments are introduced.)
  • Describe the nature of citizenship in various societies.
  • Compare institutions common to all societies such as government, education, and religious institutions.
  • Explain how the level of technology affects the development of the selected societies and identify different points of view about selected events.
  • Use a variety of rich primary and secondary source material such as biographies and autobiographies; novels; speeches and letters; and poetry, songs, and artworks to learn from and express themselves.
Throughout social studies in Kindergarten-Grade 12, students build a foundation in history; geography; economics; government; citizenship; culture; science, technology, and society; and social studies skills. The content, as appropriate for the grade level or course, enables students to understand the importance of patriotism, function in a free enterprise society, and appreciate the basic democratic values of our state and nation as referenced in the Texas Education Code, §28.002(h).
Contact Us
Hurst-Euless-Bedford ISD
1849 Central Dr.
Bedford, TX 76022
Phone: 817.283.4461
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